Doctors Education And Career Information

In India we have a special respect, love and affection towards doctors. The rich culture and heritage may be one reason, why a doctor enjoys a special attention and respect in the society, irrespective of the specialty or the number of degrees to his credit, but being a doctor isn’t that easy, years of rigorous education and then practice take all the juice out of life.

Unlike other western countries, a doctor in India is too engaged with his patients, In the good olden days, people also choose this profession as a service to the society and dedicated their lives.

The medical education in India is quite different from the west, If one wishes to become a doctor in India, after the senior secondary examinations, one has to appear for the entrance examinations that opens up the gates of a medical college, where one undergoes MBBS degree course that is of five and a half year duration, along with one year compulsory residency. Once the individual completes his/her program, they can start practicing as doctor, they can work as duty doctors or resident doctor. Further one can appear for MD/MS program, which is a higher postgraduate degree in the respective specialty.

MD in Medicine
MD is awarded to those medical graduates who are holding the MBBS degree, and after three years of study and passing an examination, which includes both theory and practical, in a pre-clinical or clinical subject of a non-surgical nature. The original research element is not as prominent here, as this is primarily a clinical qualification resembling the professional doctorates of the USA.

MS in Surgery
Similarly in surgery, orthopedics and gynecology the equivalent degree is Master of Surgery (MS). DNB (Diplomate of the National Board) qualification is considered equivalent to the MD and MS qualifications, the difference in both the qualifications is that MD/MS is awarded by the Medical council whereas DNB is from the Diplomate of national board. That can be obtained by passing an exam conducted by national board of examinations after completing 3 years post MBBS training in hospitals recognized by the board.

DM in Medicine and MCh in Surgery
One can go for further specialization in medical or surgical fields, after the first postgraduate degree, which is either MD/MS or DNB. This requires three years of hard rigorous training and study and then passing an examination, both theory and practical, and the degree awarded is DM (Doctorate in Medicine, supers specialty doctor) eg DM in Cardiology, Neurology, Nephrology, Gastro-enterology etc. For surgical sub specialties the degree awarded is MCh, eg MCh (Cardiac Surgery), MCh (Neurosurgery) etc. The DM or MCh degrees are considered equivalent to the Fellowship training offered in the US and are considered as post-doctoral degrees in India, similar to the PhD in India. Once a doctor gains a specialized degree, He /She would further practice in a super specialty hospital.

DNB- Diplomate of National Board
The Diplomate of National board or DNB is the title provided by the National Board of Examinations. It is usually noted as DNB after the name of the individual who has been conferred it. The National Board of examinations is governed by the educational arm of the Health ministry of India. DNB degree was introduced by the Health Ministry in 1975 to provide bench mark standards for higher education in India and to meet global standards.

There are also several diploma and other short-term CME programs for doctor, programs that help them in skills development and knowledge up gradation to new international norms and guidelines.

Considering the population of India, the doctor patient ratio difference is much higher, though India is country where the maximum number of medical students graduate every year, brain drain is one of the major reasons why we have such huge difference in the doctor patient ratio. Doctors migrate to other developed in pursuance of better opportunities.

Slowly but steadily, India too is catching up to the international level and with emergence of many corporate hospital would help retain those highly qualified specialist doctor with in India.

Disabled Adult Self Employment, Education, and Business Opportunities in Australia and SE Asia

The History of this form of encouragement dates back to 1917 with the formation of what is now known as the Papworth Trust. From a small TB isolation colony location it developed the training and rehabilitation process for people with disabilities to establish a goods manufacturing and marketing company staffed in the main by persons with disabilities. That ethical standard was maintained and evolved into the establishment of the Universally Recognized Pendragon Brand of High Quality Goods.

Over a period of time various charities and foundations have established pioneering educational and practical education opportunities for people with disabilities to operate in business areas particularly in countries where little encouragement had been previously provided. In certain countries even now unemployment is as high as 80% for people with disabilities.

In China the Leonard Cheshire Foundation has a project in conjunction with The China Disabled Peoples Federation which promotes self-employment and teaches skills in marketing and business analysis.

A number of qualifying students upon completion of the courses are encouraged to apply for “Start up Loans” for their new business plan. From the conceptual sole trading opening, the business owner is encouraged to employ other persons with disabilities. Similar courses to the original in Wuhan, where 100 students attended and 20 new business start ups resulted, are reportedly due to begin in Kunming this year.

The same concept was introduced in Malaysia with courses opening specifically for people with disabilities in Hospitality, Office Administration, Information Technology, and Business Management being added to the traditional Baking and Cooking.

In Australia where of all the OECD Countries the personal income of disabled Australians is the lowest of all the member countries being only 44% of the income of a non disabled person.

An important Australian innovation has the backing of Griffith University in Queensland where this week it was announced that Griffith Law School in partnership with The Spinal Industry Association will help to “Lower the Bar” of entry to Higher Education.

Shine Lawyers will lead a series of workshops related to the legal profession which it is intended will outline the provision of educational and employment opportunities available for 10 persons with disabilities to attain both a degree in law and a career within the legal profession.

In five years time it will be Papworth Trust’s Centennial year. Currently this year the Trust is supporting over 20,000 people with disabilities worldwide.

Let us all hope that by then a potential QC will have qualified from the Griffith Law School Shine Lawyers and The Spinal Injury Association’s joint innovation.

Maybe among the next “Made in China” items you buy one could have originated from a Leonard Cheshire Foundation and China Disabled Peoples Federation Start-Up Business.

These are just a sample of the many Worldwide Organizations striving to promote employment for people with disabilities. If there is one in your location why not ask yourself. “Could I get involved?” You could find it Rewarding!

Education and the Unemployment Rate

I read a couple of interesting statistics the other day in an article about the widening talent shortage among many American companies. The first was a citing about a study done by ManpowerGroup, a Milwaukee-based workforce consultant, showing that 52 % of employers can’t recruit skilled workers for their open positions. The other stat, this time by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed that of the 9.2% of American currently unemployed, 78% have only a high school education or less.

These numbers are surprising and they tell me a couple of things worth noting regarding our stubbornly high unemployment rate. One is that the rate might not be so high if Americans would get educated and trained in areas of shortage and need. The other is that thinking you are going to get ahead in the 21st century with just a high school education is not preparation for the future.

The public and their proxy the media love to play the blame game for the high unemployment rate. It’s the Democrats fault or the Republicans fault. It’s greedy Wall Street or lazy Europeans and so on and so on. Instead of finding fault, perhaps we need to hold up a mirror and look into it. We could lower the unemployment rate and all of the misery associated with it significantly if we would further our education in strategic ways. Education is one of the best ways out of this mess.

I rarely hear or read the mainstream media report about this lurking education gap as being a contributor to the unemployment rate and I pay attention to a lot of news. Why do you think that is? Why is the national anchorperson hesitant to say that too many of the unemployed are lacking in the right kinds of education? Perhaps there is a concern that to say so might be perceived as elitist or that someone’s feelings may be hurt. There is an elephant in the unemployment room that is being ignored and not fully discussed. And we as a country do ourselves no favors to avoid it.

We should address this issue head on. If we could be delivered news we could really use such as where the human resource shortages are and what is involved in preparing to fill them we could be much better informed. Let’s hear more reports about the skills deficit for a change instead of this constant obsession about budget deficits. Let’s agree that without a vigorous push for high quality education at all levels, then our chances of competing in the world marketplace are greatly diminished.

School districts and universities need to be more engaged in this conversation as well. Of course their mission is to provide a broad range of learning opportunities to the greatest number of people. But by not identifying and shifting resources to address critical shortage areas of the economy they are denying our workforce significant solutions needed now. Academic advisors and counselors need to work more aggressively aligning emerging talent with areas of employment need.

And let’s try harder to see education as the benefit that it is. There is too much of an attitude that views education more as a cost than as an investment. Education can provide individuals with practical skills, a critical thinking ability, and confidence to succeed. It’s among the best self-help techniques society can do for itself.

We can do more to reduce unemployment than to just wait for banks, corporations, or government to release more money. We can be smarter about creating a congruence between hiring gaps and workforce development.