Education and the Modern Photographer

People say I’m lucky – and yes I do agree. I get to travel world, work with a wonderful team and make my living from my passion. But when it comes down to the quality of the images I produce, that has nothing to do with luck. Over the years I have noticed a correlation between knowledge and image quality. The more I have educated myself, the ‘luckier’ I’ve become.

As I am not just the ‘biggest’, but also one of the ‘oldest’ dogs in the yard I have seen the equipment that is available to us as photographers change dramatically over the years. Film has made way for digital, and mega-pixels are no longer limited to single figures. All of the developments that have been made have no doubt made our jobs easier – particularly when it comes to transporting kit for jobs on location. Just recently I was sat in the departure lounge at Bergen airport (for those of you that haven’t been let me tell you it is without doubt the smallest international departure lounge I have ever sat in) thinking to myself that if it wasn’t for micro 4/3 technology, I would be a very unpopular man indeed as the people that I was sharing the space with would be stood outside in the cold due to the fact that my old full frame kit would have filled most of the room. The advances in photographic technology that have allowed for smaller, lighter kit that gives immediate feedback are – let’s face it – a god send, and will no doubt allow me to keep doing what I love for a few more years. The kit that is available today really is fantastic. It works well, and produces image files of a quality that was unimaginable even five years ago. But as good as all of this new equipment is, it couldn’t create anything if it wasn’t for me – or indeed one of you – controlling it. Yes, technology does have its advantages, but for a real grandmaster, technology is only there to augment, facilitate and ease the photographic process. Technology will never render photographers obsolete, it will never replace education and the application of knowledge when it comes to creating ‘grade A’ images.

As an old school traditionalist I am a firm believer in knowledge – not kit – being the secret to good photography. A stunning image is not just created by pressing click on a camera. To cross that fine line that separates good and brilliant, a photographer has to take several things in to consideration. Lighting, posing and composition. What story do you want an image to tell? how do you want the image to look? how do you want the image to feel?

Lighting an image in the correct way is key. Without the placement of hi-light and shadow in the correct places, a three dimensional story cannot be told through a two dimensional medium. It is highlight and shadow that gives an image depth and makes the subject feel real. Light is definitely the most important aspect of photography. It is no secret that ever since using the Olympus EM5 OM-D and adopting a micro 4/3 system I am on a mission to reduce the size of all of the kit I use, but I can guarantee you that this reduction in size will not come at the cost of sacrificing quality – especially not when it comes to lighting equipment. As much as I love and am amazed by the capabilities of my OM-D it is not the most important bit of kit in my bag, my lights and their modifiers however most definitely are. Whether they be speed lights or a full studio lighting kit, they are massively important. Without them I could not use the secret weapon that is fully responsible for the quality and consistence of my images. What is this secret weapon? Well I will tell you… It is the knowledge of how to control and manipulate light. How can you get this secret weapon for yourself? In the same way that I did, through education and years of practice. Practice makes perfect, it really is that simple.

The point I am trying to make, is that it is most definitely not about the kit. Having the gear doesn’t mean you automatically have all of the idea. Knowledge is the secret to being the best photographer that you can be. The camera may take the image, but it is the photographer that creates it. Owning a camera does not make you a photographer, it simply makes you a camera owner.

A photographer is born through years of continual training to obtain the technical knowledge needed to create a top quality image and countless hours of practice to fine tune their creative abilities. If I was to give you one ‘top tip’ it would be to take your time. Learn as much as you can and practice what you have learnt at every opportunity. Take your time whilst shooting an image and pay close attention to the fine details. Only press the shutter button when you have created the image you want to capture. Do not rely on Photoshop to rescue an image, it is a tool to be used for enhancement.

Now, it’s all very well and good me telling you that the secret to photographic success is knowledge, and that it takes several years of hard work to obtain the knowledge that you will need, but the world is a very real place indeed and sometimes a ‘quick fix’ is needed. Now unfortunately a quick fix isn’t such a quick fix when it comes to photography. There are however ‘fast lanes’ that can help you to develop your level of understanding at a faster rate. If I had to start from the beginning I would most definitely be factoring in education costs in to my plans. Now is a brilliant time to start making a successful career in the profession, partly due to the number of training opportunities available to new photographers. My hat goes off to the SWPP for the work that they put in to organising seminars and training days to help photographers develop. I would strongly encourage those who are new to the profession to listen to the knowledge that the old guard are sharing; after all, we’ve been there, done the job and bought the T-shirt. Learn as much as you can from the best that you can, as my grandma would say, you’re only ever as good as your teacher, so choose wisely and listen carefully.

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McGillicuddy

If Experience and Training in Distribution Centers Is So Bad: Why Don’t Statistics Show It?

A new hotel employee was asked to clean the elevators and report back to the supervisor when the task was completed. When the employee failed to appear at the end of the day the supervisor assumed that like many others he had simply not liked the job and left. However, after four days the supervisor bumped into the new employee. He was cleaning in one of the elevators. “You surely haven’t been cleaning these elevators for four days, have you?” asked the supervisor, accusingly. “Yes sir,” said the employee, “This is a big job and I’ve not finished yet – do you realize there are over forty of them, two on each floor, and sometimes they are not even there… “

The story may be familiar to some. Nonetheless the underlining message is proper training in an unfamiliar environment is essential. Warehouses and distribution centers focus a lot of attention on management training they look for the brightest, talented, and most experienced person available. Yet when it comes to hiring the staff of people who are actually going to do the work they obtain someone with minimal education and work experience. Most companies hire hourly workers who may have been to several companies in past and assimilate them into their organization immediately and getting familiar with operation as they go along or in some cases not at all.

The problem with this method is that the company gets maybe a few months of productivity from the employee before the effects from a lack of proper training and experience starts to appear. If the situation persists it can result in a lot of challenges from inventory accuracy to audits not to mention a loss of revenue for the company and the cycle repeated by terminating the employee and making the same mistake again with a new hire.

The majority of new employees in the warehouse come from other organizations or temporary services and after a few days on the job practice former company habits in receiving, storing, picking, and moving products. But all companies are not the same and although you may want them to perform in a different manner if you haven’t trained them in your company culture and processes or worst they come with a lack of experience then they usually learn from others which may not be the right way if you want to have a quality workforce.

Deficiency in Training and Experience

Deficient training and experience can have an adverse affect on your organization. In travelling the world I’ve noted many excuses as to why organizations can’t train their hourly workers properly. Some were for example “if I train them they will leave and take the training elsewhere.” Or “we don’t have the budget for company training.” But the question is can you afford not to train them? According to recent statistics the average company experiences a minimum of 1.6 hours of downtime per week (i.e. reduced production, delays in maintenance, shutdowns, and inaccurate data collection). To put it in a more proper perspective a distribution center with 50 employees who are paid $29 per hour ($15 per hour salary + $14 per hour in benefits) the downtime cost of such a company would be $9280 weekly which translates into more than $110,000 yearly.

This under the assumption that all workers in the company will be forced to stop all production during a downtime scenario which may not happen but just a few key distribution workers on the docks could create a severe impact on the operation. But before you can assess your downtime cost you need to determine its origin. The best way to accomplish this is to do a downtime threat analysis. Some threats that could cause downtime,

1. Internal and external sources

• Technological

• Accidental versus intentional

• Controllable risk or those beyond the organization’s control

• Events with prior warning versus those with no warning

• Employee sick leave

• Absenteeism

• Qualified versus non-qualified workers

2. Three questions that should be focused on when doing a threat analysis.

• Identify the relevant compliance issues

• Establish a cost associated with each compliance issue

• Develop processes to reexamine downtime threats on a continuous basis

The Benefits of Training and Experience

Having skilled and dedicated workers at the lower levels is good business practice and makes good sense. Empirical evidence shows significant correlation between experience and compensation (see Robert Willis 1986 and Theresa Devine and Nicholas Kiefer 1991 for surveys). Moreover, on-the-job-training, apprenticeships and internships provide experience at significant costs to both individuals and organizations: Sherwin Rosen (1972: p327) states, “(w)workers demand learning opportunities and are willing to pay for them since their marketable skill or knowledge and subsequent income are increased.”

The importance of experience and training your employees can provide more than just compensation it can save time for the organization; workers have a more positive feeling about the organization, they get off to a good start and, they know what they are doing.

Experience and training adds value to your organization and employers acknowledge that the values these employees bring translate to;

• Increased profits

• Decreased costs

• Increased quality, and

• Increased customer satisfaction

Heymann and Barrera (2010) exemplified the values of employees in their study where they interviewed employees at all levels, from the lowest paid to those in top management positions including CEOs, CFOs, and COOs in nine different countries. Companies ranged in size from 27 to 126,000 employees and included those in the public and private sector of the automobile, financial services, personal goods, technology hardware and equipment, pharmaceutical, food production, construction materials, and industrial metals industries.

They concluded that companies such as Costco and Great Little Box Company because of the incentives they offered from the lowest level employee to senior management had happier, more productive employees and a lower turnover ratio than their competitors in the same industry. They also found for Costco treating workers well was important it led to increased motivation and a higher quality of service. This combination along with good wages and the knowledge that there were opportunities for advancement were important incentives for employees to work hard. The high quality of service by motivated and engaged employees at Costco, coupled with the low prices, meant that customers returned, and were willing to pay the membership fees.

Great Little Box Company practiced an open-book management strategy (holding monthly meetings discussing the organizations, finances, production, and sales performance with staff members at every level) this gave employees a sense of ownership in the company yet in or to be more effective the organizations leadership incorporated profit sharing. The Great Little Box Company also encouraged employees to come up with cost saving ideas. One such idea resulted in cross-departmental use a particular piece of equipment used exclusively in the labeling department but now shared with the department charged with printing folding cartons which resulted in a cost savings of 12% a task sourced out to a printing company in the past.

Ideas and strategies of employee involvement is nothing new we’ve seen programs like TQM, Quality Circles, and Agile all stress the same thing but unlike The Great Little Box Company that actually implemented and followed through; it was just another fashionable idea that died out when the next great wave of pop management techniques came along.

The open-book management strategy has served The great Little Box Company well in terms of substantial gains and profits. The last decade their sales have doubled from 17m to 35m and in the past seven years the company’s success has enabled it to purchase the assets of six companies.

Zenger, Folkman & Edinger (2010) concluded in their study of companies that were profitable. They identified five areas that were common among the companies with substantial growth.

1. Employee satisfaction/commitment

2. Employee turnover

3. Percent of employees who think about quitting

4. Satisfaction with pay

5. High commitment

Zenger, Folkman & Edinger (2010) study although not inclusive makes a strong case that experience, training, and employee involvement is essential for growth and profitability of a company. Costco and the Great Little Box Company are two good examples of companies succeeding with experience, training, and company involvement at every level but it’s not the exact rule of thumb. Incentives and involvement are factors worth noting but in order to have great ideas to save organizations money there needs to be a certain amount of experience and training among the staff at each level.

Achieving the type of success that Costco and The Great Little Box Company has obtained; companies need to find what works for them and how it relates to company goals. Don’t follow other organizations or emulate their systems of operation because each company is different and doesn’t necessarily translate into success for your company.

References

Heymann, J., & Barrera, M. (2010). How Businesses Can Profit From Raising Compensation At The Bottom. Ivey Business Journal Dec 2010.

Rosen, S. (1972). “Learning and Experience in the Labor Market,” The Journal of Human Resources, 1972, 7. pp. 326-342.

Zenger, J., Folkman, J., & Edinger,.K. (2010). How Extraordinary Leaders Double Profits:

Decoding Leadership Trends to Discover the Patterns.

How to Choose the Best Paralegal Development and Training?

You might have heard about the paralegal. You might also know what kind of work is done by the paralegal. These people are legal professionals who perform almost the same task as the attorneys but they are unable to perform certain task which is only allowed for the attorneys because they do not have a license.

These people are non licensed attorneys. These people are not allowed to provide a legal advice to the clients. They are also not allowed to present a case in the courtroom.

Now you might want to know then what does the paralegal actually do. The duties of these professionals usually depend on the firm or the organization they for which they work. They usually have to write a lot of legal matters.

Other than this, they also need to draft some of the agreements and contracts which are related to the area of law in which they are specialized. There are different types of paralegals who work in various fields. If you are interested in this career then you need to go for proper training.

There are certain courses which can help you qualify as a paralegal professional. The paralegals always need to learn new skills. It is also important that they share their knowledge so that they can gain more knowledge regarding this field. There are different types of developmental opportunities which are good for the paralegals.

They must always try to participate in these developmental programs so that they can improve and increase their knowledge. These professionals can either work in the government firms or they can also work for the private organizations.

There are lots of paralegal development and training opportunities available these days. The professionals must complete their legal education and take proper training from certified professionals. There are lots of certification courses available these days which can also add value to the career of these people.

If you are interested in this career then you must also make sure that you attend the workshops as well as the seminars which take place. Development in this field is very necessary because this will make you almost at par with the attorneys except the license.

There are lots of things you can explore when you choose to go for the training. The training is offered by various institutions. It is very important to choose the best certificate course so that you learn the job well.

You can even earn a lot of money with the help of this career. There are various fields in this career you just need to specialize in one of them. You have the real estate, entertainment, probate, nurse paralegals which perform their job in these specified fields.