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Naturopathic Education and Career Options

Naturopathic education trains students in a wide range of areas to treat patients holistically. This non-invasive industry allows students to complete various degree programs and enter multiple careers. Naturopathic training can be obtained at an assortment of holistic healing schools.

Natural healing techniques are explored in depth within education and can include acupuncture, nutrition, hydrotherapy, and more. Students have several opportunities to gain an education in naturopathic medicine. Students can follow educational paths to become naturopathic doctors or they can complete programs to enter specific areas of the field. Naturopathic doctors use a variety of non-surgical methods to help their patients, which may include exercise and herbs. Specific training typically allows students to focus on one area of naturopathic medicine such as acupuncture. Programs can be pursued at all educational levels. A specific training path will be followed depending on career goals.

Students that work towards a degree in naturopathic medicine need to complete undergraduate education first. A bachelor’s degree in science or pre-medical studies is the most commonly completed undergraduate training. Students study biology, biochemistry, and more to prepare them for the coursework included in a doctorate level degree. Once education begins in naturopathology students study how to treat the entire person through various preventative health methods. Students learn to work with patients to prescribe the best naturopathic remedy for their pain or ailment. Traditional Chinese medicine, therapeutic medicine, manipulative therapy, homeopathy, and more are all course subjects discussed in depth within a program.

Education is broken down into two major segments. The first two years of schooling is dedicated to learning about theory and medical practice. This can include studying the chemistry of the body and disease diagnosis. The last two years of education is dedicated to clinical study, which is where students put their learning to practical use. This time can be dedicated to specific interests where students can train to become naturopathic/acupuncturists for example. After four years of intensive study students are ready to enter the profession with an in depth understanding of mind and body medicine.

Students should thoroughly research the different training options before entering doctor of naturopathic degree programs. One area of the field may interest students more and it may require less educational study, such as massage therapy training. Certificate programs that last six to nine months prepare students to enter careers as massage therapists. Education specifically teaches students to use a variety of massage therapy techniques to treat a patient’s muscle pain or injury. Pathology of disease, anatomy, and medical terminology are some courses that are included inside a program as well as natural healing training.

Through the in depth education received within this field students are able to enter many different careers. Students can become professionals upon completion of a naturopathic medicine training program. Available careers can include:

  • Naturopathic Doctors
  • Nutritionists
  • Acupuncturists

Starting a naturopathic education opens up several job possibilities. Students can begin training now to prepare for careers inside the industry. Accredited naturopathic schools are approved by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (http://www.accsc.org/) to offer the best education.

DISCLAIMER: Above is a GENERIC OUTLINE and may or may not depict precise methods, courses and/or focuses related to ANY ONE specific school(s) that may or may not be advertised on HolisticJunction.com.

Copyright 2010 – All rights reserved by HolisticJunction.com.

Cisco Certification and Training

A Cisco certification exam is one of the toughest exams for IT professionals. Cisco specializes on networking hardware and equipments such as routers and network switches. That is why its certification program is geared towards this field of information technology.

Before you attempt to take the exams provided by Cisco, you need to understand its different levels of certification. A thorough understanding of the Cisco certification tracks is important if you want to easily get a credential and become a Cisco certified professional.

The Associate Level Certifications

The Associate level certification is one of the lower-tier certification programs of Cisco. It is ideal for entry-level networking professionals. There are two different certification paths in this level.

The first path is the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) and the other one is the Cisco Certified Design Associate. It is essential for any networking professional to get certified in this level if they want to easily overcome other certification programs.

The Professional Level Certification

The next tier on the Cisco certification is the professional level. There are also two paths to this level namely the Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) and the Cisco Certified Design Professional (CCDP).

The professional level is naturally harder than the Associate certification program. There are also multiple exams that you need to pass in order top get a professional level Cisco certification. Only a small number of IT professionals in the world have credentials from Cisco in this level.

The Cisco Certified Internetworking Expert

This is the hardest certification program of Cisco and considered as the toughest credentialing program in the entire IT industry. There are few professional who hold CCIE credentials and these are the elite in the industry.

If you want to get a sure career boost and want to have a six digit income, then you should aim to have a CCIE credential. However, you have to invest more on your education and training if you want to get a CCIE certification.

How to Prepare for Cisco Certification

There are different methods of preparations for the certification. For each level, there is an appropriate approach in order to pass the Cisco exams. Here are the general approaches however, when you prepare for any Cisco certification exam:

1. Always train with a Cisco accredited training partner. Cisco has many training partners throughout the world. You have more chances of passing a certification if you train in one of its accredited training centers.

2. Always take a simulated Cisco exam. This will improve your confidence during actual certification exams. A simulated exam can also familiarize you with exam structure of Cisco.

3. Get hands-on experience or practice in a real network environment. You cannot pass any Cisco exam through brain dumping methods. You need to have solid knowledge of networking designs and systems. Cisco puts premium on practical expertise and the exams are biased towards those with actual experience.

Any Cisco certification exam will be difficult. But there is no reason why you cannot ace these exams if you prepare well and enrich your experience in the field of network design and implementation.

Forethought and Training Makes Managers

Senior management in every industry is well-known for setting-up our best skilled workers for failure. It is as if we are specifically trying to sabotage our own companies by reducing the workforce skill level and using poor management to try to fix it. A fancy new title and a raise does not a manger make. A top-notch management selection process and training program is the only road to ensure future success.

Leaders Make Great Managers:

The best worker does not make the best manager, the natural-born leader does. Though scholars continue to argue the finer details, it is widely accepted that “leaders are born and managers are made.” Leaders are followed. The directives of Managers are carried out. The Leader is the person spreading news from the grapevine, teaching trade tricks, and from whom co-workers seek advice. At breaks, the Leader can be found telling “there I was” stories with an attentive audience and organizing the weekend fishing trip or bar bash. The Manager is the person given that title by executives to be in charge of people, projects, and money.

In theory, anyone can be taught to manage well. Managers can be taught efficiency, organization, project flow, and even to earn the respect of those they manage. Managers, as the theory goes, cannot be taught how to lead. Though it is possible that the best worker is also a natural leader, this is rarely the case. Instead of looking to the firm’s best workers to serve in open management roles, consider promoting and training the natural leader. Management selection processes should begin pre-hire with an eye on identifying potential leaders. These employees should then be observed in their current role for signs of leadership and future advancement.

Tiered Management Structures:

Think large when developing the structure of management. All large companies were once small. So, instead of waiting until the company is large and then having to revamp the entire reporting chain; develop the structure at the outset. It is better to have a structure with unfilled positions, or those not currently needed in the smaller organization, then it is to remodel the entire structure at a later date to adapt it to the growing firm.

In some industries, the lowest level of management is the Shift Manager, Department Director, or Section Chief. In construction, we refer to this position as Foreman, Job Supervisor, or Superintendent. Each firm must chose these titles carefully and the reporting hierarchy with which they are associated. For the purposes of this article, let’s assume that the person who manages workers directly is called the Department Manager (DM). The Department Manager keeps the work flowing, assigns tasks, coordinates with other departments, ensures items are in-stock, and briefs the client, all while still working alongside their subordinates to facilitate the day’s activities. Department Managers report to the person who manages a number of departments, a position that is primarily office and paperwork intensive, usually called the General Manager (GM). GMs, in turn, report to a member of the Executive Staff, usually the Chief Operating Officer (COO).

It is not uncommon to further break up the management levels of DM and GM into subcategories. For example, the DM category could be sub-divided into: Junior Department Manager, Department Manager, and Senior Department Manager. A Junior DM may be the term used to describe a new entry into the management ranks who works under the direction of a DM or Senior DM. A DM would be an experienced manger with a bigger workforce and larger job assignments. Finally, a Senior DM would have the most experience at assisting with employee training, x-large projects, and those jobs requiring specialized skills or in dealing with detail-oriented clients. The Senior DM would likely run the largest or most complex department. The GM ranks could be similarly divided.

It is also wise to have pre-management positions that introduce potential entrants to the ranks without the accompanying official responsibilities. Thus, an Assistant Department Manager would serve as a normal crew member most of the time; but would be available to take over a portion of the project as needed by the DM. Additionally, they will fill-in as acting DM when the DM is on vacation or off work for personal reasons.

Management Training is Essential:

The most successful restaurant-chain in world history, McDonald’s, is the brunt of many jokes. They are, however, so successful because they are experts. Not only are they experts at “flipping burgers,” their world-renowned Hamburger University is a benchmark for educating management trainees on operation procedures, customer service, cleanliness, and business development. Similarly, Disney, United Parcel Service (UPS), Dell, and many others have been recognized as best-in-class for management and/or customer service training.

Unfortunately, many other industries have the opposite distinction. They are recognized as the industry that provides no management training or has the worst customer service. Digging deeper will usually find that these industries promote their best hopefuls with a new title and a pay bump, only to throw them to wolves by telling them to go run the workplace. Throwing a fellow in the Mississippi River to teach them to swim may have been accepted in Tom Sawyer’s day, but is a procedure doomed to fail with management trainees. At the very least, each level of management should be given initial training followed by annual re-occurring training that delves deeper and broader as employees move up through the ranks.

The best place to start is with the job description. What skills/tools will make the new manager improve company profitability and enhance reputation? Focus on key business areas:

  • Customer Service
  • Communicating Professionally
  • Reoccurring Duties
  • Completing Paperwork
  • Management & Team Building
  • Organization & Time Management
  • Technical Skill Enhancement
  • Role in Company’s Profitability
  • Official Employee Interaction
  • Merit Shop Responsibilities

Next, find outside vendors of one to two-day seminar-style courses and add self-study activities (books, books-on-tape, videos, webinars, etc.) that specialize in training new or advancing managers. Those activities that are specific to your company (completing a Job Report, corporate marketing soft-skills, or parts scheduling, for example) should be taught in-house by the DM team or executive staff.

Skills can be taught in week or multi-week long training intensive courses where a trainee focuses only on management training until completed. Or, conversely, management trainees can complete classroom training intermixed with field-work over an extended period of time (say, six months for management training).

Whatever your company’s approach, it must incorporate four overarching themes to profit and succeed in the new economy:

  1. Develop a management structure for where you want your firm to be, not where it is.
  2. Hire even entry-level technicians (apprentices) with potential management in mind.
  3. Constantly analyze the workforce to identify leaders for future management positions.
  4. Train, train, and re-train.