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We Need Better Education to Train People for New Jobs, but Isn’t That Corporate Welfare?

It is interesting that in the United States, all the politicians tell us that they are going to help provide more jobs for Americans. The first thing they point to is the notion that Americans are not qualified and trained, or educated properly for the new jobs in the new era of our growing economy and fast-paced innovative world. The reality is there is always new innovation, and the jobs do change, and therefore the training must also change. What bothers me about these podium pushing politicians that get up there and tell us these things, is that to pay for this, they wish to raise our taxes.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to pay anymore taxes, and I don’t like the inefficient way that our state and federal government runs its affairs. It’s a bloated bureaucracy and it is highly inefficient. Maybe the government needs to go back to training, and maybe the politicians need to get a life. Secondly, and I have another comment, and this one is more serious. Do you know why politicians whether Republican or Democrat always claim that the problem is education, and to get more jobs, we need more money in education?

It’s simple, because the teachers unions are supported by the Democrats. And many of the corporations support the Republicans. The corporations would love to have all of their labor pre-trained and ready to work the day they start. And they would love for someone else to do it. The teachers of course would like to have lots of work, guarantee employment, and excellent benefits.

Today, we spend more money per child in education than any other country in the world. Yes, we have one of the best educational systems around the globe, but as far as costs are concerned, we aren’t doing it as efficiently as we should.

Maybe we need to train ourselves to be more efficient, rather than training employees to be more prepared to go to work in future corporations, at the expense of the taxpayer. You see, it is corporate welfare to train people for vocational jobs, and to train them for anything more than the bare minimum needed to work in these corporations. And what about the small businesses pay so much in taxes, so that education can train people to work for their corporate competitors, thus, limiting the labor supply and causing a hardship for them?

Further, it is totally unfortunate to keep raising tuition costs on college students, making an economically enslaved the day they graduate, meaning they will be loyal employees at those corporations, because they can’t leave.

One of the problems in modern corporations today is that the labor force moves from job to job too quickly, the average person changes jobs every 2.3 years. The corporations would like to keep them longer, although they tend to lay them off, when they are no longer needed during the business cycle downturn, or to improve their stock price. If corporations want employees better trained to do those jobs, then they need to be the ones paying for it.

Next, we need competition in education, and no more free rides. Further, the federal government needs to get out of the education business, and stop telling communities in school districts how to teach. If the federal government knew how to teach people how to do things, that they wouldn’t be so screwed up themselves – are you starting to see my point? If anyone in the world, and I’m talking anyone on the Internet has a problem with what I’m saying, you may shoot me an e-mail, but be sure to come with your facts and research, because I have mine, and it is solid as a rock.

Medical Assisting Career Preparation and Training Possibilities

Enrollment in an accredited school, college, or degree program will help you to receive the educational training that you need to obtain a career in medical assisting. By completing an accredited training program in this field you will be ready to seek the employment you desire and deserve. Opportunities exist at various levels to allow you to gain the skills and knowledge that fit your needs and goals. You can work with different medical professionals in a number of settings carrying out different tasks related to the career path you choose. Start by learning more about program options and enroll today.

Medical assisting careers are available once you have earned an accredited certificate or associate degree. This can be done through enrolling in an accredited school or college. You will be required to dedicate anywhere from several months to two years on learning. By completing an associate degree or certificate program you will have the skills that are needed to enter into employment. Continuing education is also available if you wish to add to the skills and knowledge you have or pursue another medical related career.

Professionals in this field are trained to carry out a number of tasks. You can learn to work with patients and other medical professionals to:

  • Schedule Appointments
  • Draw Blood
  • Administer Medications
  • Take Vital Signs
  • Maintain Records

…and much more. Once you have received an education in medical assisting you will be able to work in various places performing these job duties.

There are different employment possibilities available to you depending on the level of education that you have chosen to receive. You can look forward to working as a medical assistant in various places such as:

  • Hospitals
  • Clinics
  • Private Practices
  • Outpatient Care Centers

…and other medical related facilities. When looking to prepare for a career in this field it is important that you complete all courses and training that is required in order to seek employment in these areas.

Coursework typically covers all areas of the field that you are obtaining an education in as well as specialized studies. By enrolling in an accredited school or college you can expect to learn various topics that relate to the profession you choose. Course topics will vary but can help you to learn accounting, anatomy, keyboarding, medical terminology, medical law, laboratory techniques, and much more. Pursuing an education in this field will teach you to become a medical professional by providing you with the certificate or degree training you need to enter the workforce and begin employment.

Accredited medical assisting colleges are designed to provide the proper educational training that is necessary for you to enter a successful career. You can ensure that you will obtain the best possible education by enrolling in a program that carries full accreditation. Agencies like the ACICS ( http://www.acics.org/ ) are approved to accredit schools and colleges that meet all criteria. You can start training for the career you dream of by finding a program and enrolling today.

DISCLAIMER: Above is a GENERIC OUTLINE and may or may not depict precise methods, courses and/or focuses related to ANY ONE specific school(s) that may or may not be advertised on our website.

Copyright 2010 – All rights reserved by PETAP, LLC.

Education and Communications Pathways and Pitfalls

“Communications help to keep people feeling included in and connected to the organization…give people information, and do it again and again.” — William Bridges, Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change

o You need to establish the few core messages you want to communicate throughout your organization. Use any and every communication channel you can to review, remind, and reinforce them. These include:

o Newsletters

o Videos

o Voice and e-mail updates and dialogues

o Recognition and celebration events

o Annual shareholder reports

o Annual improvement reports

o Visits to, from, and among customers and partners

o Special improvement days and fairs that allow teams to display their activities and results

o Orientation and training sessions

o Teleconferences

o Intranet sites

o Toll-free hot lines and telephone information centers

o Get out and talk to people. Multiple communication channels can and should be widely used to reinforce and support your core messages. But the best way to communicate is in person. The most effective communication approaches are like political campaigns. Leaders are out actively “pressing the flesh” and standing up to present their change and improvement themes and core messages. During times of major change or refocus, we’ve seen senior managers at some large organizations spend well over one hundred days per year delivering these vital communication messages. That’s leadership.

o Develop your “stump speech” or “talking points” among your management team before any of you heads out to give your version to the rest of the organization. This generally includes messages around your Change Drivers, Focus and Context (vision, values, and purpose), key goals and priorities, change/improvement plans, and such.

o Get people together. Get teams together weekly, monthly, and certainly no less than quarterly. That’s especially important for management, operational, or improvement teams that aren’t in the same building. At my previous consulting company, The Achieve Group, we found frequent face-to-face communications were the most important when we could least afford the time or the money to hold them. We continually find that getting the key players together can turn around most misunderstandings, mistrust, and misdirection. BUT, and here’s the “big if” – only if the meetings are well run.

o Develop highly visible scoreboards, bulletin boards, or voice mail, electronic or printed announcements of progress toward team and organization goals and priorities.

o Share all core strategic measurements (including “confidential” financial, and operating data) with everyone in your organization. Treat people like full-fledged business partners and they’ll act that way. But don’t snow them under with a blizzard of meaningless reports and numbers. Train everyone how to read these data. Show them how to relate the measurements to their daily operations and improvement activities.

o Team education, learning, and communication can be kept simple. In my early management years I got a lot of mileage from having my team sit around a conference table reading, discussing, and debating selected book passages or articles. This dialogue established a common values and knowledge base that enhanced mutual understanding, teamwork, communications, and context for further training and work together.

o Establish an internal “best practices and good tries” communication system, clearinghouse, or network. A free flow of information and active communications is the lifeblood of a learning organization. Use videos, visits, fairs, Intranet sites, voice and e-mail, meetings, reports, hot lines, teleconferences, information technologies, and the like.

o Get feedback from your customers and partners on the characteristics of your education and communication strategies, systems, and practices. How many communication channels are you using? Are they clogged or working well? What others could you be using?

o When you’re sick of repeating the same core messages over and over again is about the time that people in your organization are just starting to hear you. First they didn’t understand. Then they didn’t believe. If you stop repeating yourself now, they’ll conclude that you weren’t serious after all.

o Just as a marketing professional would never rely on just one marketing channel, don’t rely too heavily on the management hierarchy to deliver your core messages. It’s full of filters and personal agendas that twist and distort your messages. Yet you can’t go around your managers. They need to be central in communicating, reinforcing, and repeating your core themes. So start with them and give them that responsibility. But don’t assume it will be delivered as you wanted. That’s why personal meetings and multiple communication channels are so important.

o Keep moving your best people to the teams, positions, and parts of the organization that will spread their experience and leadership as broadly as possible. It’s also a great way to continue their development.

o Reward and thank people who bring you bad news before it’s festered into a catastrophe.

Trust and communication levels go together. Find out how high your organization or team trust levels are. If they’re low find out what’s causing the problem. This may be painful. The source of misunderstandings and mistrust is often in the leaders’ behavior.